<i>Knights Across the Atlantic: The Knights of Labor in Britain and Ireland</i> by Steven Parfitt

(A Book Review)


Abstract

György Tóth's review of Steven Parfitt's Knights Across the Atlantic: The Knights of Labor in Britain and Ireland. Studies in Labour History, 7. Liverpool
University Press, 2016.


Keywords

The Knights of Labor; American Exceptionalism; craft unionism; labor; new unionism; Steven Parfitt; book review

Parfitt, Steven. Knights Across the Atlantic: The Knights of Labor in Britain and Ireland. Studies in Labour History, 7. Liverpool University Press, 2016.


Published : 2019-09-09


TóthG. (2019). <i>Knights Across the Atlantic: The Knights of Labor in Britain and Ireland</i&gt; by Steven Parfitt. Review of International American Studies, 12(1), 151-156. https://doi.org/10.31261/rias.7781

György Tóth  gyorgy.toth@stir.ac.uk
University of Stirling  United Kingdom
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4557-0846

I earned my Ph.D. in the interdisciplinary field of American Studies from The University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA, in 2012. I also hold MAs in American Studies and English Language and Literature from Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary, and The University of Iowa.

I was born and raised in Budapest, Hungary, where I witnessed the historic transition of the Eastern Bloc to democracy and capitalism in 1989-1991. As part of my Master's programme in American Studies, I held a Kellner Scholarship to Bard College, New York, where I witnessed the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and the U.S. response. In 2004, the same year that Hungary joined the European Union, I moved to the U.S. Midwestern state of Iowa to study for a PhD. During my years there I witnessed the re-election of George W. Bush to the presidency, the campaign that made Barack Obama president of the United States, and the legalization of same-sex marriage in the state. While in Iowa, I was fortunate to receive training and work experience not only in the usual academic duties, but also in archival management and international education. In 2012, I attained the position of assistant professor at the Department of American Studies at Charles University in Prague, Czechia, where I continued cultivating my European identity. Since the autumn of 2014 I have been Lecturer of post-1945 U.S. History and Transatlantic Relations at the division of History, Politics and Heritage of the University of Stirling. Here I have witnessed the aftermath of the Scottish independence referendum, and the Brexit referendum and the Scottish response. I have been exploring Scotland's places and history as a vantage point for understanding transatlantic relations and the dynamics of U.S. culture in Europe.






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